[ Free kindle ] A History of Greek Philosophy 3.2: SocratesAuthor W.K.C. Guthrie – Sharkmotorcyclehelmets.co.uk

This Book, Like The Age It Reflects, Is A Brilliant Achievement Professor Guthrie S Study Combines Remarkable Erudition And Inclusiveness Of Scope With A Lucid And Readable StyleProfessor Guthrie Succeeds In Giving Us The Most Balanced And Perceptive Treatment Of Fifth Century Thought That Has Yet Been Written American Historical Review


10 thoughts on “A History of Greek Philosophy 3.2: Socrates

  1. says:

    A History of Greek Philosophy 3.2 Socrates, W.K.C GuthrieA History of Greek Philosophy, Volume III The Fifth Century Enlightenment Part 1 The Sophists Part 2 Socrates 1971 Professor Guthrie s study combines remarkable erudition and inclusiveness of scope with a lucid and readable styleSocrates c 470 399 BC was a classical Greek Athenian philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher, of the Western ethical tradition of thought An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers writing after his lifetime, particularly his students Plato and Xenophon 2006 1376 335 9645838630 5 20 470 399


  2. says:

    A History of Greek Philosophy The Sophists, W.K.C GuthrieA History of Greek Philosophy, Volume III The Fifth Century Enlightenment Part 1 The Sophists Part 2 Socrates 1971 Professor Guthrie s study combines remarkable erudition and inclusiveness of scope with a lucid and readable styleSocrates c 470 399 BC was a classical Greek Athenian philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher, of the Western ethical tradition of thought An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers writing after his lifetime, particularly his students Plato and Xenophon 2006 1375 291 1 155 .


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  4. says:

    Guthrie s book is a study of the life and work of ancient Greek philosopher Socrates Socrates never put any of his ideas in writing, as he preferred to develop his ideas through dialogue with people he hustled on the Agora in Athens Consequently, all we know about him stems from the writings of his disciples and some enemies , mostly Platon and Xenophon This poses an obvious problem does what they attribute to Socrates reflect Socrates own ideas, or do they communicate their own thoughts through the authority of Socrates In the first part, Guthrie attempts to answer this question by distilling what the different sources on Socrates have in common Luckily, some of that was already done by the philosopher Aristotle, who, as a disciple of Platon, was close enough to Socrates time without being biased through personal acquaintance Guthrie concludes that many if not most of what Platon or Xenophon wrote about Socrates can be considered true, in Platon s case with the exception of those major works such as The Republic in which his own theories significantly expand beyond Socrates ideas.The second part of the book is a brief study of life and character of Socrates Here we learn about his political and religious beliefs, and what he perceived to be his divine inner voice which time and again prevented him from making bad decisions It was partly due to his trust in this inner voice that Socrates chose death at his trial rather than agreeing to exile, believing that if the voice did not warn him, death could not be such a bad option after all.The third part is the main part of the book and elucidates Socrates philosophy Though in his youth Socrates was studying science and mathematics like philosophers did in those days, he eventually focused his concerns on the question of how to lead a good life and the nature of virtue He philosophised through dialogue with others, persistently asking questions to lead his companion to step by step find answers for himself or end the conversation in frustration, accusing Socrates of playing tricks with his mind In this process, he was keen come up with clear definitions of the objects under discussion, which were to be derived by distilling the characteristic properties from a number of examples, or in other cases In many cases this process did not lead to proper definitions, though, but to the realisation that the object is not as well understood as previously believed Guthrie makes the case that Socrates was essentially the first one to introduce this strict emphasis of proper definitions into philosophy, and also the one who established, though certainly not invented, inductive reasoning in the thought process An interesting discussion is given about some rather rigorous thoughts such as the equating of virtue and knowledge, which lead Socrates to conclude that wrong doing is always a consequence of ignorance, for knowledgeable people would always act virtuously No surprise that this reasoning was rejected by later philosophers, mostly Aristotle The main problem with Socratic definitions seem to be the ignorance of the multiple meanings a word can have in different contexts this problem haunted philosophy ever since.The text gives only few examples, so in order to get a feel for the Socratic approach to understanding, turn to the Socratic dialogues with the sophists and others written down by Platon Guthrie s book is an interesting read and serves its purpose well, even though at times the writing is somewhat academically convoluted and dry.


  5. says:

    It s a tall task to summarize the philosophy and personality of a thinker who lived nearly 2,000 years ago and produced no surviving written works, but W.K.C Guthrie manages about as best as can be expected in Socrates Guthrie ambitiously and sensibly uses source material from the works of the four major figures who wrote about Socrates Plato, Xenophon, Aristophanes and Aristotle , and indicates the strengths and defects of each source What emerges is a brief but probably as comprehensive as possible description of Socrates and the highlights of his philosophy Guthrie s work is rather academic the biographic information is constantly sidetracked by justifications for his interpretation of the sources and critiques of other biographer s theories There are many footnotes, and both the main text and notes often quote in French, German and ancient Greek without any translation Still, the portrait that emerges is a useful one capable of shedding light on Socrates as a character in Plato s dialogues, even if delivered a stilted and perhaps necessarily cumbersome fashion.


  6. says:

    A great study of Socrates Guthrie does his homework and gives us fascinating details about Socrates s life and personality This in itself makes the study praiseworthy given that these details are dispersed throughout numerous ancient sources making it difficult to paint a coherent picture of Socrates Thus, this book is likely to be of interest and insight to the academician than the general reader This is true even so of the latter half of the book Here Guthrie dives into uniquely Socratic themes, investigating what distinguishes Socrates s philosophy from Plato s This can get a little cumbersome, but truly does help the reader see Socrates s unique contribution to Western philosophy, showing us how he has his own identity and shadow apart from those of his greatest pupil I look forward to reading the vols on Plato.